The Two Wills of God: Does God Really Have Two Wills? - by C. Matthew McMahon

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Does God have two wills? It sure does seem like He does when on the one hand, “our God is in the heavens He doth whatsoever He pleases,” and then “God repenteth that He made man…” What do we make…

The Two Wills of God, by C. Matthew McMahon, Ph.D., Th.D.

EBOOK
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eISBN: 978-0-979577-93-2

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Print, 549 pages, (Buy the print book Here) $39.99
ISBN: 978-1-62663-124-3

C. Matthew McMahon, Ph.D., Th.D., is an American Calvinist Reformed theologian and adjunct professor at Whitefield Theological Seminary. He is the founder and chairman of A Puritan’s Mind, the largest Reformed website on the internet for students of the Bible concerning Reformed Theology, the Puritans and Covenant Theology. He is also the founder of Puritan Publications which publishes rare Reformed and Puritan works from the 17th century.

Throughout Christian history, hard questions have been deliberated concerning God’s will and the manner in which God saves and damns. Understanding God’s will and how it theologically functions in relationship to man’s salvation can be a daunting task since the Bible is no small book. Answering some of those questions from the Scriptures brings biblical clarity and aids us to understand the glorious God that we serve and the manner in which he deals with men.

Have you ever wondered: Does God love only the elect? If God does not desire the wicked to perish, is God’s will frustrated when the sinner goes his own way? Why is God seen as “repenting,” or “sad,” and even “changing His mind”? What is “common grace,” and is it really found in the Bible? Does God desire things He does not decree, and does He decree things He does not desire? How many wills does God actually have?

This book gives the Christian the proper hermeneutical tools to define “God’s will” and how that will works in and through redemptive history. It solves the questions surrounding Calvinism and Arminianism, demonstrating that proper exegetical and hermeneutical considerations will aid the student of Scripture to say emphatically that God does not have two wills.