True Worship and the Consequences of Idolatry - by John Knox (1505-1572)

$5.99 (tax incl.)

If God alone determines the manner in which sinners approach him, is any other kind of worship acceptable to Him?

True Worship and the Consequences of Idolatry – by John Knox (1505-1572).

EBOOK
File Types: PDF, MOBI and EPub
eBook download price: $4.99
eISBN: 978-1-62663-302-5

PRINT
125 Pages, Paperback Print ($13.99) (Buy the Printed book HERE)
ISBN: 978-1-62663-303-2

John Knox (1505-1572) was a Scottish Reformer and fiery preacher of the Gospel, who, by God’s providence, was used as a catalyst for one of the greatest religious revivals in Protestant history at the time of the Reformation.

Do you know the difference between true and false worship? Can false worship be true worship? Is God honored by false worship even when you are sincere in giving it? Knox defines idolatry as, “all worshipping, honoring, or service invented by the brain of man in the religion of God, without his own express commandment.” Are you an idolater? As much as this might be a hard question to consider, it is an appropriate question in light of God’s directives in Scripture to regard him as holy in corporate worship.

In considering the sin of idolatry, whether directly worshipping sticks, stones and idols, or being part of a deviant worship service in a 21st century church, such thoughts on worship are exceedingly relevant for us today. Without coming to God as God requires, we do not worship God as he has instructed us in scripture.

Knox’s treatise on True and False Worship demonstrates the inescapable consequence to consider whether you are worshipping God in the vanity of your own mind, being directed by the dictates of another aberrant mind, or, whether you are engaging in true worship as God requires. Considering this is not a vain thing, for as God says to Moses, “For it is not a vain thing for you; because it is your life,” (Deut. 32:47). Professing Christians must consider that it is God alone who determines the manner in which sinners approach him. On this, and this alone, they are to tender up to God his due.

(This work is not a scan or facsimile, has been carefully transcribed by hand being made easy to read in modern English, and has an active table of contents for electronic versions.)