The Doctrine and Practice of Infant Baptism - by John Brinsley (1600-1665)

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In this masterful work, Brinsley demonstrates both the doctrinal and exegetical nature of baptism, and the practical side of baptism. It is a thoughtful and deep work which leads the reader through careful consideration often not found in other works…

The Doctrine and Practice of Infant Baptism
by John Brinsley (1600-1665)

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eISBN: 978-1-62663-103-8

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John Brinsley (1600-1665), the younger, was a Presbyterian puritan divine who was a powerful Reformed Gospel preacher and writer.

In this masterful work, Brinsley demonstrates both the doctrinal and exegetical nature of baptism, and the practical side of baptism. He says, “They to whom belongs the kingdom of God, who are subjects, and members of the kingdom of grace, and heirs of the kingdom of glory, they have right to this seal of the covenant, by which this their interest may be confirmed and sealed up to them.” Where in this meticulous statement do we find the phrase “baptism” or “infant baptism” or for that matter, any hint of baptism of any kind? This exquisite statement is exactly the same idea that covenant theologians have, for centuries, biblically demonstrated and expounded upon in order to confirm to the people of Christ’s church the nature of the covenant of Christ, as well as polemically deter those who would bar young children from the sacrament of baptism. Yet, this doctrinal statement simply gives the reader all the ammunition needed to defend the Gospel of the covenant of Christ. It does this against those who would twist or change such a string of covenant pearls found in the bible which could never be unstrung. It is the biblical substance which ushers in a thorough Reformation that only full covenant theologians, who are the only thorough Reformers, could accomplish for a full exposition of the Bible.

In reality, infant baptism ought to be the last five minutes of a five day conversation of the covenant of God. That is the substance of this work, and the manner in which Brinsley treats God’s covenant and infant inclusion in the Covenant of Grace. It would be spiritually beneficial for the church to consider such a statement in the full orbed account of God’s covenant from Genesis to Revelation.

This work is not a scan or facsimile, has been carefully transcribed by hand being made easy to read in modern English, and has an active table of contents for electronic versions.